Mudit Dandwate and Gaurav Parchani

Entrepreneurship

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Quick Facts

  • Mudit Dandwate and Gaurav Parchani have invented a device that not only works as a step-down ICU but also helps monitor a patient's vital parameters remotely
  • Having studied automobile engineering, the duo used their knowledge of automotive sensors (that track the health of a car) to create a device that captures micro-vibrations of the body
  • Under the One million initiative, hospitals do not have to pay for the service. They have now completed close to 270 hospitals in India across 30 districts

"We feel that every bed should have an ICU-like system."

An ICU under your bed


The Dozee was created out of sheer need. It is a mat that works as a step-down ICU and helps monitor one’s vitals remotely.

 

When Mudit Dandwate's relative fell ill, 30-year-old Mudit felt the need to monitor his vitals remotely and give an early warning through a smartphone. 

 

Luckily for Dandwate, a graduate from IIT Bombay, his former colleague Gaurav Parchani (30) — an IIT Indore graduate — was thinking of making something to benefit society at large.

 

The duo began working on this idea together — and Dozee strip was born. 

 

Dozee is a mat installed underneath a bed. It provides readings (such as the pulse rate) and is connected to a server, which enables remote viewing of the patient’s parameters.

 

Having studied automobile engineering, the duo used their knowledge of automotive sensors (that track the health of a car) to create a device that captures micro-vibrations of the body from under a mattress using artificial intelligence.

 

Eventually, they set up their company, Turtle Shell Technologies, to manufacture Dozee mattresses.

 

Initially, Dozee was available over the counter on e-commerce platforms as a wellness device and was meant to be used in homes. During the pandemic, the duo started reaching out to hospitals and nursing homes.

 

“Now we are looking at it as a prescriptive device,” says Dandwate. 

 

“In a hospital, we can connect it with more complex systems like SPO2 sensors, ECG, etc., but at home, we can't do that,” says Dandwate. 

 

The duo soon started getting calls from nursing homes and hospitals from as far as Bidar and Hubballi, who wanted the system because it made monitoring easy.

 

“Hospitals had to cater to the needs of patients beyond their capacity; this resulted in a higher demand for our product,” says Parchani.

 

Dr Manjunath, an anaesthetist at K R Hospital, Bengaluru, says, “This technology is definitely a plus. We are able to monitor 20 patients at the nursing station itself. It will take a while for us to assess how accurate the system is. Also, network connectivity can be an issue.”

 

One million initiative

 

Though it is a business, the IIT-ians haven't forgotten why they started this - to serve society.

 

“There are approximately one million public hospital beds in India and we feel that every bed should have an ICU-like system. We have now completed close to 270 hospitals across 30 districts.”

 

This initiative has reached even the remote corners of India, including states like Sikkim. Under this initiative, hospitals do not have to pay for the service. Dozee depends on CSR and corporate funds.  

 

“Typically they support for about six to 12 months, till these hospitals realise the worth of the product,” explains Dandwate.

 

The mats last for five years. The product that can be used at home costs Rs 12,000 plus yearly recurring costs of Rs 6,000 for data sharing, etc. So far, Rs five crore has been raised by Dozee.

 

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